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Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Site-based Program FY 2018 Competitive Grant Announcement

Signed into law on July 22, 2016, the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA) is the first major federal substance abuse treatment and recovery legislation in 40 years and the most comprehensive legislative effort to address the opioid epidemic. CARA establishes a comprehensive, coordinated, and balanced strategy through enhanced grant programs that encompass prevention and education efforts, effective responses to those affected by substance abuse, and services for treatment and recovery from addiction. The Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Site-based Program (COAP) was developed as part of the CARA legislation. COAP’s purpose is to provide financial and technical assistance to states, units of local government, and Indian tribal governments to plan, develop, and implement comprehensive efforts to identify, respond to, treat, and support those impacted by the opioid epidemic.

This solicitation will award funding in six categories, several of which may be relevant to a Public Defender program working in this space:

  • Category 1: First Responder Partnerships
  • Category 2: Technology-assisted Treatment Projects
  • Category 3: System-level Diversion Projects
  • Category 4: Statewide Planning, Coordination, and Implementation Projects
  • Category 5: Harold Rogers Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) Implementation and Enhancement Projects
  • Category 6: Public Safety, Behavioral Health, and Public Health Information-sharing Partnerships
Deadline: 
06/07/2018
Funding Source: 
Bureau of Justice Assistance
Eligible Grantees: 

Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
Special district governments
City or township governments
State governments
County governments

Upholding the Rule of Law and Preventing Wrongful Convictions Program Department of Justice

This solicitation presents competitive awards to create multidisciplinary teams to assess and address areas of risk for wrongful conviction and to review and assess post conviction claims of innocence. Applicants will lead collaborative teams of prosecutors, conviction integrity units and innocence programs to complete the work. The solicitation will also seek a training and technical assistance provider to provide support to selected projects through training and hands on technical assistance.

The URLPWC Program supports partnerships between conviction integrity or review units (“Units”) and entities that represent individuals with post-conviction claims of innocence (“Entities”), to review cases of legitimate post-conviction and appeals claims of innocence and to enact measures to ensure justice. Where possible, the URLPWC Program seeks to identify actual perpetrators of crimes, and to bring justice to victim(s), thereby enhancing public safety.

By advancing methodologies and policies that address the underlying causes of wrongful convictions, URLPWC funding will help prosecutors, law enforcement, defense counsel, and courts to identify actual perpetrators, and to develop training tools, policies, and procedures that can prevent wrongful convictions. In addition, Unit reviews may also result in the identification of systemic issues related to prior practices and errors, as well as new forensic practices that can contribute to preventing wrongful convictions. URLPWC will thereby support prosecutorial efforts to address violent crime and improve criminal prosecution, resulting in safer neighborhoods.

Public Defender programs are encouraged to apply under Category 1:

Category 1: Eligible applicants are limited to state and local governments with authority over prosecutors’ offices that work to prevent, identify, and correct false or wrongful convictions, state and local public defender’s offices, nonprofit organizations (including tribal nonprofit or for-profit organizations) dedicated to judicial verdicts that comport to the rule of law, and institutions of higher education (including tribal institutions of higher education). Applications must include a partnership between a state or local prosecutor’s office and an organization or entity dedicated to ensuring just convictions and/or acquittals.

Deadline: 
06/11/2018
Funding Source: 
Bureau of Justice Assistance
Eligible Grantees: 

City or township governments
Special district governments
County governments
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Private institutions of higher education
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
For profit organizations other than small businesses
State governments
Small businesses

Criminal Justice & Policing Reform

**We see potential for Public Defenders to connect to this funding stream in several areas. Primarily, through the Charles Koch Foundation's focus on sentencing and research gaps we see opportunities for proposal success that demonstrates the value of investigators and mitigation experts in reducing over incarceration, collateral consequences, and in reducing the jurisdictions overall budget bottom line, as well as proposals that support reentry programs and client support programs. Should you be interested in connecting with NLADA directly to discuss proposal ideas or seek support, please email Emily Flanagan at [email protected].**

The Charles Koch Institute and Charles Koch Foundation work on five areas of criminal justice and policing reform in order to improve public safety, reduce costs, and respect the dignity of each individual:

  • Sentencing: Too many people go to prison - often for far too long - for low-level, nonviolent crimes. People who break the law should be held accountable, but the punishment should fit the crime.
  • Second Chances: Thousands of laws erect barriers for those with a criminal record to getting jobs and rejoining their communities with dignity, increasing the likelihood of recidivism.
  • Overcriminalization: Thousands of seemingly ordinary activities are classified as crimes. We shouldn't criminalize so many things, and jail should be reserved for people who are truly dangerous.
  • Civil Asset Forfeiture: Law enforcement officers can take your property if they suspect it relates to a crime, even if you're innocent. Getting your property back is difficult, and the seized assets may go directly to a law enforcement agency's budget. Policing should be about public safety, not profit.
  • Policing Practices: Many law enforcement departments are using equipment and tactics from the battlefield. When police are seen as peace officers rather than an occupying force, community trust can grow. This trust and collaboration is important to solving crime and protecting the public.

The Charles Koch Foundation requests proposals for research related to criminal justice and policing reform. We are especially interested in research that:

  • Analyzes the possible personal/non-economic and economic (including employment) effects of various sentencing reform ideas on individuals, families, and communities.
  • Examines the causes, costs, and consequences of police militarization and civil asset forfeiture, including public perception of these topics.
  • Collects or creates data sets to fill scholarly gaps related to criminal justice and policing reform issues.
  • Determines the causes, costs, and consequences of over criminalization and the proliferation of laws that carry criminal penalties.
  • Assesses the effectiveness of various penalties imposed for crimes.
  • Examines the incentives that lead to growing prison populations.

 

Deadline: 
08/01/2018
Funding Source: 
The Charles Koch Foundation
Eligible Grantees: 

**Public Defender offices will likely need to form an external partnership in order to be eligible for these funds.**

Criminal Justice & Policing Reform

**We see potential for Public Defenders to connect to this funding stream in several areas. Primarily, through the Charles Koch Foundation's focus on sentencing and research gaps we see opportunities for proposal success that demonstrates the value of investigators and mitigation experts in reducing over incarceration, collateral consequences, and in reducing the jurisdictions overall budget bottom line, as well as proposals that support reentry programs and client support programs. Should you be interested in connecting with NLADA directly to discuss proposal ideas or seek support, please email Emily Flanagan at [email protected].**

The Charles Koch Institute and Charles Koch Foundation work on five areas of criminal justice and policing reform in order to improve public safety, reduce costs, and respect the dignity of each individual:

  • Sentencing: Too many people go to prison - often for far too long - for low-level, nonviolent crimes. People who break the law should be held accountable, but the punishment should fit the crime.
  • Second Chances: Thousands of laws erect barriers for those with a criminal record to getting jobs and rejoining their communities with dignity, increasing the likelihood of recidivism.
  • Overcriminalization: Thousands of seemingly ordinary activities are classified as crimes. We shouldn't criminalize so many things, and jail should be reserved for people who are truly dangerous.
  • Civil Asset Forfeiture: Law enforcement officers can take your property if they suspect it relates to a crime, even if you're innocent. Getting your property back is difficult, and the seized assets may go directly to a law enforcement agency's budget. Policing should be about public safety, not profit.
  • Policing Practices: Many law enforcement departments are using equipment and tactics from the battlefield. When police are seen as peace officers rather than an occupying force, community trust can grow. This trust and collaboration is important to solving crime and protecting the public.

The Charles Koch Foundation requests proposals for research related to criminal justice and policing reform. We are especially interested in research that:

  • Analyzes the possible personal/non-economic and economic (including employment) effects of various sentencing reform ideas on individuals, families, and communities.
  • Examines the causes, costs, and consequences of police militarization and civil asset forfeiture, including public perception of these topics.
  • Collects or creates data sets to fill scholarly gaps related to criminal justice and policing reform issues.
  • Determines the causes, costs, and consequences of over criminalization and the proliferation of laws that carry criminal penalties.
  • Assesses the effectiveness of various penalties imposed for crimes.
  • Examines the incentives that lead to growing prison populations.

 

Deadline: 
11/01/2018
Funding Source: 
The Charles Koch Foundation
Eligible Grantees: 

**Public Defender offices will likely need to form an external partnership in order to be eligible for these funds.**