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FY 2018 Opioid State Targeted Response Technical Assistance (Short Title: STR TA)

**This opportunity is not designed for Public Defender offices to apply directly however it may be a good opportunity to participate actively in the described consortia to provide expertise on the impact of contact with the criminal justice system on individuals with opiod use disorders. Additionally, Public Defender offices may want to follow up to determine the selected awardee for potential future partnership.**

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Centers for Substance Abuse Treatment and Prevention are accepting applications for the fiscal year (FY) 2018 Opioid State Targeted Response (STR) Technical Assistance (TA) grant. This grant will be provided to a single entity who will serve as the central coordinating point for ensuring the requirements of this funding opportunity are met. Although there is a single grantee, applications including a consortia with other national allied professional associations are encouraged. The purpose of this program is to identify local physicians, other clinicians, and other providers, for example, advance practice nurses, physician assistants, peers and other healthcare professionals with expertise in treatment and in recovery services for opioid use disorders (OUDs). Based on a state, territory, or tribal nation’s assessed need, these providers will serve as the primary providers of federally supported TA for the program’s successful implementation. The goal of this TA is to ensure the provision of evidence-based prevention, treatment, and recovery support programs/services across the Opioid STR program.

Deadline: 
12/26/2017
Funding Source: 
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
Eligible Grantees: 

Eligible applicants are domestic public and private nonprofit entities. For example: • Public or private universities and colleges • Community- and faith-based organizations • Professional guilds

DELTA (Domestic Violence Prevention Enhancement and Leadership Through Alliances) Impact

The purpose of this NOFO is to bring about decreases in IPV risk factors and increases in IPV protective factors by increasing strategic data-driven planning and sustainable use of community and societal level primary prevention activities that address the social determinants of health (SDOH) and are based on the best available evidence. In addition, the NOFO will help to further develop the evidence-base for community and societal-level programs and policy efforts to prevent IPV by increasing the use of evaluation and existing surveillance data at the state and local level. Another goal of the NOFO is for SDVCs to support the integration of primary prevention goals and action steps throughout the state and local level IPV planning and capacity building activities. The aim of integrating primary prevention into state planning is to help states leverage diverse funding and partnerships to increase the implementation of primary prevention above and beyond DELTA funding. DELTA Impact requires SDVCs to focus on the implementation of 3 to 4 evidence-informed programs and policy efforts within three specific focus areas. SDVCs will also focus on developing or enhancing an already-existing State Action Plan (SAP) to increase the use of data for planning and the prioritization of primary prevention of IPV based on any existing health inequities within their jurisdictions. SDVCs will be expected to participate in the national evaluation of the NOFO and provide leadership at the state and national level. They will also provide funding and technical assistance to the Coordinated Community Response teams (CCRs) selected to implement and evaluate the chosen programs and policy efforts.

Deadline: 
01/15/2018
Funding Source: 
Centers for Disease Control
Eligible Grantees: 

As provided for in 42 USC § 10402, to be eligible, an organization must: (1) be a State Domestic Violence Coalition; and (2) include representatives of pertinent sectors of the local community, which may include: (A) health care providers and State or local health departments; (B) the education community; (C) the faith-based community; (D) the criminal justice system; (E) family violence, domestic violence, and dating violence service program advocates; (F) human service entities such as State child services divisions; (G) business and civic leaders; and (H) other pertinent sectors. For a list of HHS-designated State Domestic Violence Coalitions, see: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/fysb/state-dv-coalitions. If the applicant’s organization is not on this list, the applicant must provide a paragraph describing how they meet the above criteria. The term ‘State’ means each of the several States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and, except as otherwise provided, Guam, American Samoa, the United States Virgin Islands, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. A Bona Fide Agent is an agency/organization identified by the state as eligible to submit an application under the state eligibility in lieu of a state application. If applying as a bona fide agent of a state or local government, a legal, binding agreement from the state or local government as documentation of the status is required. 

DELTA (Domestic Violence Prevention Enhancement and Leadership Through Alliances) Impact

**This opportunity specifically includes representatives of the criminal justice system as eligible applicants when represented within a State Domestic Violence Coalition.**

Violence is a serious, yet preventable, public health problem. Intimate partner violence (IPV) (see glossary for a list of definitions of italicized words) affects millions of women, men, and children. In the United States, 1in 4 women and 1 in 9 men experience contact sexual violence, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner with a negative impact such as injury, fear, concern for safety, or needing services (Smith et al, 2017). The Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS) data showed many victims of IPV began experiencing these forms of violence prior to adulthood (Smith, et al, 2017). About 7% of women and 4% of men in the US reported their first experience of IPV before age 18 (Smith et al, 2017). Community and societal-level prevention activities can address risk and protective factors associated with IPV and may have the broadest public health impact. Authorized by the Family Violence and Prevention Services Act (FVPSA), CDC has funded the Domestic Violence Prevention Enhancements and Leadership Through Alliances (DELTA) Program since 2002. The DELTA program funds State Domestic Violence Coalitions (SDVCs) to implement statewide IPV prevention efforts, while also providing assistance and funding for local communities to implement IPV prevention activities. Different iterations of DELTA have focused funding on increasing organizational capacity, implementation and evaluation of IPV primary prevention activities.The purpose of this NOFO is to bring about decreases in IPV risk factors and increases in IPV protective factors by increasing strategic data-driven planning and sustainable use of community and societal level primary prevention activities that address the social determinants of health (SDOH) and are based on the best available evidence. In addition, the NOFO will help to further develop the evidence-base for community and societal-level programs and policy efforts to prevent IPV by increasing the use of evaluation and existing surveillance data at the state and local level. Another goal of the NOFO is for SDVCs to support the integration of primary prevention goals and action steps throughout the state and local level IPV planning and capacity building activities. The aim of integrating primary prevention into state planning is to help states leverage diverse funding and partnerships to increase the implementation of primary prevention above and beyond DELTA funding. DELTA Impact requires SDVCs to focus on the implementation of 3 to 4 evidence-informed programs and policy efforts within three specific focus areas. SDVCs will also focus on developing or enhancing an already-existing State Action Plan (SAP) to increase the use of data for planning and the prioritization of primary prevention of IPV based on any existing health inequities within their jurisdictions. SDVCs will be expected to participate in the national evaluation of the NOFO and provide leadership at the state and national level. They will also provide funding and technical assistance to the Coordinated Community Response teams (CCRs) selected to implement and evaluate the chosen programs and policy efforts.

Deadline: 
01/16/2018
Funding Source: 
Centers for Disease Control
Eligible Grantees: 

As provided for in 42 USC § 10402, to be eligible, an organization must: (1) be a State Domestic Violence Coalition; and (2) include representatives of pertinent sectors of the local community, which may include: (A) health care providers and State or local health departments; (B) the education community; (C) the faith-based community; (D) the criminal justice system; (E) family violence, domestic violence, and dating violence service program advocates; (F) human service entities such as State child services divisions; (G) business and civic leaders; and (H) other pertinent sectors. For a list of HHS-designated State Domestic Violence Coalitions, see: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/fysb/state-dv-coalitions. If the applicants organization is not on this list, the applicant must provide a paragraph describing how they meet the above criteria. The term State means each of the several States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and, except as otherwise provided, Guam, American Samoa, the United States Virgin Islands, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. A Bona Fide Agent is an agency/organization identified by the state as eligible to submit an application under the state eligibility in lieu of a state application. If applying as a bona fide agent of a state or local government, a legal, binding agreement from the state or local government as documentation of the status is required.

SAMHSA Offender Reentry Program Funding Opportunity

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT) is accepting applications for fiscal year (FY) 2018 Offender Reentry Program (ORP) grants.  The purpose of this program is to expand substance use disorder (SUD) treatment and related recovery and reentry services to sentenced adult offenders/ex-offenders with a SUD and/or co-occurring substance use and mental disorders, who are returning to their families and community from incarceration in state and local facilities including prisons, jails, or detention centers (hereafter known as “the population of focus”).

For the purpose of this FOA, sentenced adult offenders/ex-offenders are defined as persons 18 years of age or older (or adults as defined by your state or tribal law) under the jurisdiction of the criminal justice system who have been sentenced to incarceration as adults. If your state or tribe uses a different age range for adult offenders, you must document how the age of “adults” is defined in your state or tribal justice system.  Applicants are expected to form stakeholder partnerships that will plan, develop and provide a transition from incarceration to community-based SUD treatment and related reentry services. 

SAMHSA’s interest is to actively support offender reentry stakeholder partnerships so that clinical needs are met and clients are treated using evidence-based practices.  By providing needed treatment and recovery services, this program is intended to reduce the health and social costs of substance use and dependence to the public, and increase the safety of America’s citizens by reducing substance use related crime and violence.  Additional anticipated outcomes include:  increased number of individuals served; increased abstinence from substance use; increased employment rates; decreased recidivism rates; increased housing stability; decreased criminal justice involvement; improved individual and family functioning and well-being; increased social connectedness; and decreased risky behaviors.  

Deadline: 
01/26/2018
Funding Source: 
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
Eligible Grantees: 

ligible applicants are domestic public and private nonprofit entities.  For example:

  • State governmentsthe District of Columbia, Guam, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau are also eligible to apply.
  • Governmental units within political subdivisions of a state, such as a county, city or town.
  • Federally recognized American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) tribes and tribal organizations, Urban Indian Organizations, and consortia of tribes or tribal organizations.
  • Public or private universities and colleges.
  • Community- and faith-based organizations.

Tribal organization means the recognized body of any AI/AN tribe; any legally established organization of AI/ANs which is controlled, sanctioned, or chartered by such governing body, or which is democratically elected by the adult members of the Indian community to be served by such organization, and which includes the maximum participation of AI/ANs in all phases of its activities.  Consortia of tribes or tribal organizations are eligible to apply, but each participating entity must indicate its approval.  A single tribe in the consortium must be the legal applicant, the recipient of the award, and the entity legally responsible for satisfying the grant requirements.

Urban Indian Organization (UIO) (as identified by the Office of Indian Health Service Urban Indian Health Programs through active Title V grants/contracts) means a non-profit corporate body situated in an urban center governed by an urban Indian-controlled board of directors, and providing for the maximum participation of all interested individuals and groups, which body is capable of legally cooperating with other public and private entities for the purpose of performing the activities described in 503(a) of 25 U .S.C. § 1603.  UIOs are not tribes or tribal governments and do not have the same consultation rights or trust relationship with the federal government.

Criminal Justice & Policing Reform

**We see potential for Public Defenders to connect to this funding stream in several areas. Primarily, through the Charles Koch Foundation's focus on sentencing and research gaps we see opportunities for proposal success that demonstrates the value of investigators and mitigation experts in reducing over incarceration, collateral consequences, and in reducing the jurisdictions overall budget bottom line, as well as proposals that support reentry programs and client support programs. Should you be interested in connecting with NLADA directly to discuss proposal ideas or seek support, please email Emily Flanagan at [email protected].**

The Charles Koch Institute and Charles Koch Foundation work on five areas of criminal justice and policing reform in order to improve public safety, reduce costs, and respect the dignity of each individual:

  • Sentencing: Too many people go to prison - often for far too long - for low-level, nonviolent crimes. People who break the law should be held accountable, but the punishment should fit the crime.
  • Second Chances: Thousands of laws erect barriers for those with a criminal record to getting jobs and rejoining their communities with dignity, increasing the likelihood of recidivism.
  • Overcriminalization: Thousands of seemingly ordinary activities are classified as crimes. We shouldn't criminalize so many things, and jail should be reserved for people who are truly dangerous.
  • Civil Asset Forfeiture: Law enforcement officers can take your property if they suspect it relates to a crime, even if you're innocent. Getting your property back is difficult, and the seized assets may go directly to a law enforcement agency's budget. Policing should be about public safety, not profit.
  • Policing Practices: Many law enforcement departments are using equipment and tactics from the battlefield. When police are seen as peace officers rather than an occupying force, community trust can grow. This trust and collaboration is important to solving crime and protecting the public.

The Charles Koch Foundation requests proposals for research related to criminal justice and policing reform. We are especially interested in research that:

  • Analyzes the possible personal/non-economic and economic (including employment) effects of various sentencing reform ideas on individuals, families, and communities.
  • Examines the causes, costs, and consequences of police militarization and civil asset forfeiture, including public perception of these topics.
  • Collects or creates data sets to fill scholarly gaps related to criminal justice and policing reform issues.
  • Determines the causes, costs, and consequences of over criminalization and the proliferation of laws that carry criminal penalties.
  • Assesses the effectiveness of various penalties imposed for crimes.
  • Examines the incentives that lead to growing prison populations.

 

Deadline: 
02/01/2018
Funding Source: 
The Charles Koch Foundation
Eligible Grantees: 

Any

Communities Building Healthier Environments for a Stronger Nation Initiative (‘Communities Initiative’)

**This may be a great opportunity for an office that has an internal program or existing relationship with a mental health provider or organization**

The Communities Building Healthier Environments for a Stronger Nation Initiative (‘Communities Initiative’) intends to demonstrate the effectiveness of community-based networks in improving health outcomes among racial and ethnic minority and/or other disadvantaged populations. This program seeks to improve health outcomes through the establishment of integrated networks that collaboratively employ evidence-based disease management and preventive health activities; build the capacity of communities to address social determinants and barriers to healthcare access; and increase access to and utilization of preventive health care, medical treatment, and supportive services. The Communities Initiative specifically targets the unmet healthcare and supportive service needs of racial and ethnic minority populations at highest risk for poorer health outcomes. Health services provided under the Communities Initiative will not be denied to any person based on race, color, or national origin. Populations at highest risk include, but are not limited to, individuals who are newly diagnosed and lack a medical home; individuals who experience difficulty in adhering to a prescribed medical treatment plan; individuals with a chronic disease that is not well managed; and individuals that are unstably housed. Specific health areas to be addressed by the Communities Initiative include asthma, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis B or C, obesity/overweight, and mental disorders. Community health programs are required to address social determinants of health, and improve coordination of health, social, and supportive services to significantly improve health outcomes among minority and/or disadvantaged communities. Applicants must choose two but no more than three chronic conditions to be the focus of the proposed intervention, but should justify this choice based on the population targeted and the interrelation of the chronic conditions. Project plans relative to health areas must include screening and early detection; implementation of evidence-based prevention and intervention programs; chronic disease management; linkage to medical treatment and follow-up; and coordination of applicable health, social and support services. Project plans must also address social determinants relative to selected health areas that directly facilitate the onset or transmission of disease or impact adherence to prescribed medical treatment plans.

Grantor Contact Information: Robin Fuller Senior Grants Management Specialist, 240-453-8830

Deadline: 
04/02/2018
Funding Source: 
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health
Eligible Grantees: 

State Governments • County Governments • City or township governments • Special district governments • Independent school districts • Public and State controlled institutions of higher education • Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized) • Public Housing authorities/Indian housing authorities • Native American tribal organizations (other than federally recognized tribal governments) • Nonprofits having 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education • Nonprofits without 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education • Private institutions of higher education • For profit Organizations other than small business • Small Businesses

Criminal Justice & Policing Reform

**We see potential for Public Defenders to connect to this funding stream in several areas. Primarily, through the Charles Koch Foundation's focus on sentencing and research gaps we see opportunities for proposal success that demonstrates the value of investigators and mitigation experts in reducing over incarceration, collateral consequences, and in reducing the jurisdictions overall budget bottom line, as well as proposals that support reentry programs and client support programs. Should you be interested in connecting with NLADA directly to discuss proposal ideas or seek support, please email Emily Flanagan at [email protected].**

The Charles Koch Institute and Charles Koch Foundation work on five areas of criminal justice and policing reform in order to improve public safety, reduce costs, and respect the dignity of each individual:

  • Sentencing: Too many people go to prison - often for far too long - for low-level, nonviolent crimes. People who break the law should be held accountable, but the punishment should fit the crime.
  • Second Chances: Thousands of laws erect barriers for those with a criminal record to getting jobs and rejoining their communities with dignity, increasing the likelihood of recidivism.
  • Overcriminalization: Thousands of seemingly ordinary activities are classified as crimes. We shouldn't criminalize so many things, and jail should be reserved for people who are truly dangerous.
  • Civil Asset Forfeiture: Law enforcement officers can take your property if they suspect it relates to a crime, even if you're innocent. Getting your property back is difficult, and the seized assets may go directly to a law enforcement agency's budget. Policing should be about public safety, not profit.
  • Policing Practices: Many law enforcement departments are using equipment and tactics from the battlefield. When police are seen as peace officers rather than an occupying force, community trust can grow. This trust and collaboration is important to solving crime and protecting the public.

The Charles Koch Foundation requests proposals for research related to criminal justice and policing reform. We are especially interested in research that:

  • Analyzes the possible personal/non-economic and economic (including employment) effects of various sentencing reform ideas on individuals, families, and communities.
  • Examines the causes, costs, and consequences of police militarization and civil asset forfeiture, including public perception of these topics.
  • Collects or creates data sets to fill scholarly gaps related to criminal justice and policing reform issues.
  • Determines the causes, costs, and consequences of over criminalization and the proliferation of laws that carry criminal penalties.
  • Assesses the effectiveness of various penalties imposed for crimes.
  • Examines the incentives that lead to growing prison populations.
Deadline: 
05/01/2018
Funding Source: 
The Charles Koch Foundation
Eligible Grantees: 

Any

Criminal Justice & Policing Reform

**We see potential for Public Defenders to connect to this funding stream in several areas. Primarily, through the Charles Koch Foundation's focus on sentencing and research gaps we see opportunities for proposal success that demonstrates the value of investigators and mitigation experts in reducing over incarceration, collateral consequences, and in reducing the jurisdictions overall budget bottom line, as well as proposals that support reentry programs and client support programs. Should you be interested in connecting with NLADA directly to discuss proposal ideas or seek support, please email Emily Flanagan at [email protected].**

The Charles Koch Institute and Charles Koch Foundation work on five areas of criminal justice and policing reform in order to improve public safety, reduce costs, and respect the dignity of each individual:

  • Sentencing: Too many people go to prison - often for far too long - for low-level, nonviolent crimes. People who break the law should be held accountable, but the punishment should fit the crime.
  • Second Chances: Thousands of laws erect barriers for those with a criminal record to getting jobs and rejoining their communities with dignity, increasing the likelihood of recidivism.
  • Overcriminalization: Thousands of seemingly ordinary activities are classified as crimes. We shouldn't criminalize so many things, and jail should be reserved for people who are truly dangerous.
  • Civil Asset Forfeiture: Law enforcement officers can take your property if they suspect it relates to a crime, even if you're innocent. Getting your property back is difficult, and the seized assets may go directly to a law enforcement agency's budget. Policing should be about public safety, not profit.
  • Policing Practices: Many law enforcement departments are using equipment and tactics from the battlefield. When police are seen as peace officers rather than an occupying force, community trust can grow. This trust and collaboration is important to solving crime and protecting the public.

The Charles Koch Foundation requests proposals for research related to criminal justice and policing reform. We are especially interested in research that:

  • Analyzes the possible personal/non-economic and economic (including employment) effects of various sentencing reform ideas on individuals, families, and communities.
  • Examines the causes, costs, and consequences of police militarization and civil asset forfeiture, including public perception of these topics.
  • Collects or creates data sets to fill scholarly gaps related to criminal justice and policing reform issues.
  • Determines the causes, costs, and consequences of over criminalization and the proliferation of laws that carry criminal penalties.
  • Assesses the effectiveness of various penalties imposed for crimes.
  • Examines the incentives that lead to growing prison populations.

 

Deadline: 
08/01/2018
Funding Source: 
The Charles Koch Foundation
Eligible Grantees: 

Any

Criminal Justice & Policing Reform

**We see potential for Public Defenders to connect to this funding stream in several areas. Primarily, through the Charles Koch Foundation's focus on sentencing and research gaps we see opportunities for proposal success that demonstrates the value of investigators and mitigation experts in reducing over incarceration, collateral consequences, and in reducing the jurisdictions overall budget bottom line, as well as proposals that support reentry programs and client support programs. Should you be interested in connecting with NLADA directly to discuss proposal ideas or seek support, please email Emily Flanagan at [email protected].**

The Charles Koch Institute and Charles Koch Foundation work on five areas of criminal justice and policing reform in order to improve public safety, reduce costs, and respect the dignity of each individual:

  • Sentencing: Too many people go to prison - often for far too long - for low-level, nonviolent crimes. People who break the law should be held accountable, but the punishment should fit the crime.
  • Second Chances: Thousands of laws erect barriers for those with a criminal record to getting jobs and rejoining their communities with dignity, increasing the likelihood of recidivism.
  • Overcriminalization: Thousands of seemingly ordinary activities are classified as crimes. We shouldn't criminalize so many things, and jail should be reserved for people who are truly dangerous.
  • Civil Asset Forfeiture: Law enforcement officers can take your property if they suspect it relates to a crime, even if you're innocent. Getting your property back is difficult, and the seized assets may go directly to a law enforcement agency's budget. Policing should be about public safety, not profit.
  • Policing Practices: Many law enforcement departments are using equipment and tactics from the battlefield. When police are seen as peace officers rather than an occupying force, community trust can grow. This trust and collaboration is important to solving crime and protecting the public.

The Charles Koch Foundation requests proposals for research related to criminal justice and policing reform. We are especially interested in research that:

  • Analyzes the possible personal/non-economic and economic (including employment) effects of various sentencing reform ideas on individuals, families, and communities.
  • Examines the causes, costs, and consequences of police militarization and civil asset forfeiture, including public perception of these topics.
  • Collects or creates data sets to fill scholarly gaps related to criminal justice and policing reform issues.
  • Determines the causes, costs, and consequences of over criminalization and the proliferation of laws that carry criminal penalties.
  • Assesses the effectiveness of various penalties imposed for crimes.
  • Examines the incentives that lead to growing prison populations.

 

Deadline: 
11/01/2018
Funding Source: 
The Charles Koch Foundation
Eligible Grantees: 

Any