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Reimagining America’s Crisis Response Systems

**This solicitation may be a good fit for programs that have existing relationships with crisis stabilization, response, and diversion facilities. If you have current programs to support clients experiencing crisis related to mental illness, substance use, or homelessness in addition please read the solicitation to learn more.**

The Laura and John Arnold Foundation (LJAF) is committed to leveraging the power of data, research, and innovation to improve community safety by reducing crime, increasing police effectiveness, and working to ensure that laws are enforced in a fair and equitable way. 

Individuals experiencing mental illness, substance use disorders, or homelessness require evidence based, preventive treatment to achieve improved outcomes. Too often, the needs of these vulnerable populations are not only unmet, but inadvertently worsened by emergency response systems. With police having to act as the primary responders to a crisis, individuals often end up in situations that lead to the use of force, arrest, and/or incarceration. These approaches fail to address individuals’ underlying health, societal, and financial struggles; are cost-inefficient; and cause significant harm to both the individual and the community.

The Laura and John Arnold Foundation are working to identify and help implement evidence-based policies and programs that can reduce the use of force, arrest, and/or incarceration, and instead connect vulnerable populations to evidence-based treatment programs and services for improved outcomes. To support this goal, LJAF seeks proposals for evaluations of (1) emergency response programs for individuals in moments of crisis, (2) post-crisis stabilization facilities, and/or (3) treatment programs and services funded by governments or other entities. Evaluations should focus on outcomes for individuals whose vulnerabilities include mental illness, substance use disorders, and/or homelessness.

LJAF will host a Q&A webinar on the RFP on October 5, 2018 at 3:00 PM EST. Prospective applicants are strongly encouraged to attend. Attendees should sign up for the webinar using this form.

Deadline: 
11/05/2018
Funding Source: 
The Laura and John Arnold Foundation
Eligible Grantees: 

This is a research solicitation. Eligible applications will include a clear proposal for research and evaluation. 

Criminal Justice & Policing Reform

**We see potential for Public Defenders to connect to this funding stream in several areas. Primarily, through the Charles Koch Foundation's focus on sentencing and research gaps we see opportunities for proposal success that demonstrates the value of investigators and mitigation experts in reducing over incarceration, collateral consequences, and in reducing the jurisdictions overall budget bottom line, as well as proposals that support reentry programs and client support programs. Should you be interested in connecting with NLADA directly to discuss proposal ideas or seek support, please email Emily Flanagan at [email protected].**

The Charles Koch Institute and Charles Koch Foundation work on five areas of criminal justice and policing reform in order to improve public safety, reduce costs, and respect the dignity of each individual:

  • Sentencing: Too many people go to prison - often for far too long - for low-level, nonviolent crimes. People who break the law should be held accountable, but the punishment should fit the crime.
  • Second Chances: Thousands of laws erect barriers for those with a criminal record to getting jobs and rejoining their communities with dignity, increasing the likelihood of recidivism.
  • Overcriminalization: Thousands of seemingly ordinary activities are classified as crimes. We shouldn't criminalize so many things, and jail should be reserved for people who are truly dangerous.
  • Civil Asset Forfeiture: Law enforcement officers can take your property if they suspect it relates to a crime, even if you're innocent. Getting your property back is difficult, and the seized assets may go directly to a law enforcement agency's budget. Policing should be about public safety, not profit.
  • Policing Practices: Many law enforcement departments are using equipment and tactics from the battlefield. When police are seen as peace officers rather than an occupying force, community trust can grow. This trust and collaboration is important to solving crime and protecting the public.

The Charles Koch Foundation requests proposals for research related to criminal justice and policing reform. We are especially interested in research that:

  • Analyzes the possible personal/non-economic and economic (including employment) effects of various sentencing reform ideas on individuals, families, and communities.
  • Examines the causes, costs, and consequences of police militarization and civil asset forfeiture, including public perception of these topics.
  • Collects or creates data sets to fill scholarly gaps related to criminal justice and policing reform issues.
  • Determines the causes, costs, and consequences of over criminalization and the proliferation of laws that carry criminal penalties.
  • Assesses the effectiveness of various penalties imposed for crimes.
  • Examines the incentives that lead to growing prison populations.

 

Deadline: 
11/01/2018
Funding Source: 
The Charles Koch Foundation
Eligible Grantees: 

**Public Defender offices will likely need to form an external partnership in order to be eligible for these funds.**

Criminal Justice & Policing Reform

**We see potential for Public Defenders to connect to this funding stream in several areas. Primarily, through the Charles Koch Foundation's focus on sentencing and research gaps we see opportunities for proposal success that demonstrates the value of investigators and mitigation experts in reducing over incarceration, collateral consequences, and in reducing the jurisdictions overall budget bottom line, as well as proposals that support reentry programs and client support programs. Should you be interested in connecting with NLADA directly to discuss proposal ideas or seek support, please email Emily Flanagan at [email protected].**

The Charles Koch Institute and Charles Koch Foundation work on five areas of criminal justice and policing reform in order to improve public safety, reduce costs, and respect the dignity of each individual:

  • Sentencing: Too many people go to prison - often for far too long - for low-level, nonviolent crimes. People who break the law should be held accountable, but the punishment should fit the crime.
  • Second Chances: Thousands of laws erect barriers for those with a criminal record to getting jobs and rejoining their communities with dignity, increasing the likelihood of recidivism.
  • Overcriminalization: Thousands of seemingly ordinary activities are classified as crimes. We shouldn't criminalize so many things, and jail should be reserved for people who are truly dangerous.
  • Civil Asset Forfeiture: Law enforcement officers can take your property if they suspect it relates to a crime, even if you're innocent. Getting your property back is difficult, and the seized assets may go directly to a law enforcement agency's budget. Policing should be about public safety, not profit.
  • Policing Practices: Many law enforcement departments are using equipment and tactics from the battlefield. When police are seen as peace officers rather than an occupying force, community trust can grow. This trust and collaboration is important to solving crime and protecting the public.

The Charles Koch Foundation requests proposals for research related to criminal justice and policing reform. We are especially interested in research that:

  • Analyzes the possible personal/non-economic and economic (including employment) effects of various sentencing reform ideas on individuals, families, and communities.
  • Examines the causes, costs, and consequences of police militarization and civil asset forfeiture, including public perception of these topics.
  • Collects or creates data sets to fill scholarly gaps related to criminal justice and policing reform issues.
  • Determines the causes, costs, and consequences of over criminalization and the proliferation of laws that carry criminal penalties.
  • Assesses the effectiveness of various penalties imposed for crimes.
  • Examines the incentives that lead to growing prison populations.

 

Deadline: 
08/01/2018
Funding Source: 
The Charles Koch Foundation
Eligible Grantees: 

**Public Defender offices will likely need to form an external partnership in order to be eligible for these funds.**

Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN) National Training and Technical Assistance Program

**Although this solicitation does not explicitly name Public Defenders as a possible source of partnerships, we feel that a Public Defender office working in reentry or in client and community based defense may be an excellent candidate as a primary or secondary grantee. This is a fantastic opportunity to reach out to "unlikely" partners to form fundable relationships to support your work and your communities.**

Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN) is designed to create and foster safer neighborhoods through a sustained reduction in violent crime, including but not limited to, criminal gang violence and the felonious possession and use of firearms. The program's effectiveness is based on the cooperation and partnering of local, state, tribal, and federal agencies engaged in a unified approach led by the United States Attorney (USA) in each district.

Led by the USA, the PSN task force typically includes both federal and local prosecutors, federal law enforcement agencies (Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives [ATF], Drug Enforcement Administration, Federal Bureau of Investigation [FBI], and U.S. Marshals Service), local and state law enforcement agencies, probation and parole offices, and the certified fiscal agent. The inclusion of local government leaders, social service providers, neighborhood leaders, members of the faith community, and business leaders, is also essential.

Deadline: 
07/09/2018
Funding Source: 
Bureau of Justice Assistance
Eligible Grantees: 

Applicants are limited to nonprofit organizations, for-profit organizations (including tribal nonprofit or for-profit organizations), institutions of higher education (including tribal institutions of higher education), faith-based organizations, and consortiums with demonstrated experience in addressing and developing strategies to reduce violent crime. This includes, but is not limited to, prevention, enforcement, prosecution, intervention, and reentry strategies. Additionally, only applicants that have experience delivering training and technical assistance on a national level are eligible to apply. All recipients and subrecipients (including any for-profit organization) must forgo any profit or management fee.

Second Chance Act Statewide Adult Recidivism Reduction Strategic Plan Implementation Program

**This solicitation applies only to applicants in Alaska, Utah, Louisiana, Delaware, and the District of Columbia.**

**This solicitation may be an excellent opportunty for Public Defenders with active, inactive, or defunded reentry programs to revitilize and expand their work.**

The purpose of the FY 2018 Second Chance Act Statewide Adult Recidivism Reduction Strategic Plan Implementation Program (SRR Implementation Program) is to provide state agencies with resources and technical assistance to implement previously developed strategic plans that will result in improved reentry systems and reduced recidivism among populations released from incarceration. Funds can be used to support capacity-building activities, including staff training to meet the rehabilitative and supervision needs of the supervision population; assessing and addressing gaps and/or quality of service provision; standardizing new or existing strategies to promote replication and scaling; and developing and implementing performance metrics.

Deadline: 
07/05/2018
Funding Source: 
Bureau of Justice Assistance
Eligible Grantees: 

Eligible applicants are limited to the five state/jurisdictional recipients of BJA’s fiscal year (FY) 2017 Second Chance Act (SCA) Statewide Adult Recidivism Reduction Strategic Planning Program awards. These five state/jurisdictional recipients are: Alaska, Utah, Louisiana, Delaware, and the District of Columbia.

Upholding the Rule of Law and Preventing Wrongful Convictions Program Department of Justice

This solicitation presents competitive awards to create multidisciplinary teams to assess and address areas of risk for wrongful conviction and to review and assess post conviction claims of innocence. Applicants will lead collaborative teams of prosecutors, conviction integrity units and innocence programs to complete the work. The solicitation will also seek a training and technical assistance provider to provide support to selected projects through training and hands on technical assistance.

The URLPWC Program supports partnerships between conviction integrity or review units (“Units”) and entities that represent individuals with post-conviction claims of innocence (“Entities”), to review cases of legitimate post-conviction and appeals claims of innocence and to enact measures to ensure justice. Where possible, the URLPWC Program seeks to identify actual perpetrators of crimes, and to bring justice to victim(s), thereby enhancing public safety.

By advancing methodologies and policies that address the underlying causes of wrongful convictions, URLPWC funding will help prosecutors, law enforcement, defense counsel, and courts to identify actual perpetrators, and to develop training tools, policies, and procedures that can prevent wrongful convictions. In addition, Unit reviews may also result in the identification of systemic issues related to prior practices and errors, as well as new forensic practices that can contribute to preventing wrongful convictions. URLPWC will thereby support prosecutorial efforts to address violent crime and improve criminal prosecution, resulting in safer neighborhoods.

Public Defender programs are encouraged to apply under Category 1:

Category 1: Eligible applicants are limited to state and local governments with authority over prosecutors’ offices that work to prevent, identify, and correct false or wrongful convictions, state and local public defender’s offices, nonprofit organizations (including tribal nonprofit or for-profit organizations) dedicated to judicial verdicts that comport to the rule of law, and institutions of higher education (including tribal institutions of higher education). Applications must include a partnership between a state or local prosecutor’s office and an organization or entity dedicated to ensuring just convictions and/or acquittals.

Deadline: 
06/11/2018
Funding Source: 
Bureau of Justice Assistance
Eligible Grantees: 

City or township governments
Special district governments
County governments
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Private institutions of higher education
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
For profit organizations other than small businesses
State governments
Small businesses

Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Site-based Program FY 2018 Competitive Grant Announcement

Signed into law on July 22, 2016, the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA) is the first major federal substance abuse treatment and recovery legislation in 40 years and the most comprehensive legislative effort to address the opioid epidemic. CARA establishes a comprehensive, coordinated, and balanced strategy through enhanced grant programs that encompass prevention and education efforts, effective responses to those affected by substance abuse, and services for treatment and recovery from addiction. The Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Site-based Program (COAP) was developed as part of the CARA legislation. COAP’s purpose is to provide financial and technical assistance to states, units of local government, and Indian tribal governments to plan, develop, and implement comprehensive efforts to identify, respond to, treat, and support those impacted by the opioid epidemic.

This solicitation will award funding in six categories, several of which may be relevant to a Public Defender program working in this space:

  • Category 1: First Responder Partnerships
  • Category 2: Technology-assisted Treatment Projects
  • Category 3: System-level Diversion Projects
  • Category 4: Statewide Planning, Coordination, and Implementation Projects
  • Category 5: Harold Rogers Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) Implementation and Enhancement Projects
  • Category 6: Public Safety, Behavioral Health, and Public Health Information-sharing Partnerships
Deadline: 
06/07/2018
Funding Source: 
Bureau of Justice Assistance
Eligible Grantees: 

Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
Special district governments
City or township governments
State governments
County governments

NIJ FY18 Research on Reducing Violence in Communities

**This solicitation may be a good fit for Public Defender offices with existing or future programs and partnerships around reentry work. Reentry programming can and should be connected to reductions in community violence and increases in public safety.**

The purpose of this solicitation is to support research to produce sustainable community-level reductions in violence. NIJ seeks to develop scientific evidence and build practical knowledge of the factors that contribute to achieving enduring violence reductions in communities. NIJ is interested in receiving proposals for research with both empirical and theory-building elements that will lead to practical and generalizable recommendations. These recommendations should inform community-focused efforts to produce substantial and lasting violence reductions in communities that have suffered from persistently high levels of violence.

Deadline: 
05/21/2018
Funding Source: 
National Institute of Justice
Eligible Grantees: 

Small businesses
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Individuals
For profit organizations other than small businesses
Private institutions of higher education
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
County governments
Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
City or township governments
State governments

NIJ FY18 Research and Evaluation on the Administration of Justice

**This grant opportunity explicitly seeks applicants who are involved in diversion and pretrial protocols.**

NIJ seeks applications for funding investigator-initiated, interdisciplinary research and evaluation projects related to the administration of justice in three priority areas: (1) eyewitness evidence; (2) front-end intervention strategies (diversion and deflection, pretrial notification protocols and court appearance compliance, and justice system-led strategies aimed at young-adult offenders); and (3) enhancing investigation and prosecution (body worn cameras, and jury nullification). Strong applications that address the administration of justice in the U.S. but fall outside these areas may also be considered.

Deadline: 
05/14/2018
Funding Source: 
National Institute of Justice
Eligible Grantees: 

Private institutions of higher education
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Small businesses
Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
City or township governments
For profit organizations other than small businesses
County governments
Individuals
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
State governments

Criminal Justice & Policing Reform

**We see potential for Public Defenders to connect to this funding stream in several areas. Primarily, through the Charles Koch Foundation's focus on sentencing and research gaps we see opportunities for proposal success that demonstrates the value of investigators and mitigation experts in reducing over incarceration, collateral consequences, and in reducing the jurisdictions overall budget bottom line, as well as proposals that support reentry programs and client support programs. Should you be interested in connecting with NLADA directly to discuss proposal ideas or seek support, please email Emily Flanagan at [email protected].**

The Charles Koch Institute and Charles Koch Foundation work on five areas of criminal justice and policing reform in order to improve public safety, reduce costs, and respect the dignity of each individual:

  • Sentencing: Too many people go to prison - often for far too long - for low-level, nonviolent crimes. People who break the law should be held accountable, but the punishment should fit the crime.
  • Second Chances: Thousands of laws erect barriers for those with a criminal record to getting jobs and rejoining their communities with dignity, increasing the likelihood of recidivism.
  • Overcriminalization: Thousands of seemingly ordinary activities are classified as crimes. We shouldn't criminalize so many things, and jail should be reserved for people who are truly dangerous.
  • Civil Asset Forfeiture: Law enforcement officers can take your property if they suspect it relates to a crime, even if you're innocent. Getting your property back is difficult, and the seized assets may go directly to a law enforcement agency's budget. Policing should be about public safety, not profit.
  • Policing Practices: Many law enforcement departments are using equipment and tactics from the battlefield. When police are seen as peace officers rather than an occupying force, community trust can grow. This trust and collaboration is important to solving crime and protecting the public.

The Charles Koch Foundation requests proposals for research related to criminal justice and policing reform. We are especially interested in research that:

  • Analyzes the possible personal/non-economic and economic (including employment) effects of various sentencing reform ideas on individuals, families, and communities.
  • Examines the causes, costs, and consequences of police militarization and civil asset forfeiture, including public perception of these topics.
  • Collects or creates data sets to fill scholarly gaps related to criminal justice and policing reform issues.
  • Determines the causes, costs, and consequences of over criminalization and the proliferation of laws that carry criminal penalties.
  • Assesses the effectiveness of various penalties imposed for crimes.
  • Examines the incentives that lead to growing prison populations.
Deadline: 
05/01/2018
Funding Source: 
The Charles Koch Foundation
Eligible Grantees: 

**Public Defender offices will likely need to form an external partnership in order to be eligible for these funds.**

BJA FY 18 Innovations in Supervision Initiative: Building Capacity to Create Safer Communities

**This opportunity may be a good fit for a Public Defender office working in reentry programming or with partnerships in reentry programming.**

The Smart Supervision Program seeks to improve the capacity and effectiveness of community supervision agencies to increase probation and parole success rates and reduce the number of crimes committed by those under probation and parole supervision, which would in turn reduce admissions to prisons and jails and save taxpayer dollars. Funds will be awarded in two categories. In Category 1, state and local agencies will be selected to improve supervision using evidence-based supervision strategies or to innovate new strategies to improve outcomes for supervisees. For example, agencies may test supervision strategies with offenders at high risk of committing or being victimized by violence and may shift supervision strategies from time focused to goal focused and from mass supervision to focus on individualized supervision. In Category 2, a TTA provider will work with three sites to develop a model for law enforcement and prosecutors to work with probation departments with regard to high risk, violent offenders. The TTA provider will select three sites in concert with BJA and pass through funds to support their work.

Deadline: 
05/01/2018
Funding Source: 
Bureau of Justice Assistance
Eligible Grantees: 

City or township governments
County governments
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Private institutions of higher education
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
For profit organizations other than small businesses
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)

BJA FY 18 Second Chance Act Comprehensive Community-Based Adult Reentry Program

**This opportunity may be a good fit for a Public Defender office working in reentry programming who also has existing or is willing to form partnerships with community organizations working in reentry programming.**

Through this solicitation, the Bureau of Justice Assistance will support community- and faith-based organizations in developing and implementing comprehensive and collaborative programs that support people who are reentering communities from incarceration who are at medium- to high-risk of reoffending, reduces recidivism, and improves public safety. Develop comprehensive case management plans that directly address criminogenic risks and needs as identified by validated criminogenic risk assessments and include delivery or facilitation of services in a manner consistent with participants' learning styles and abilities. Demonstrate increased collaboration between community- and faith-based organizations and corrections, community supervision, law enforcement, and other local reentry stakeholders.

Deadline: 
05/01/2018
Funding Source: 
Bureau of Justice Assistance
Eligible Grantees: 

Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education

**Public Defender offices will likely need to form an external partnership in order to be eligible for these funds.**

NIJ FY18 Paul Coverdell Forensic Science Improvement Grants Program

This program seeks to improve the quality and timeliness of forensic science and medical examiner services, including services provided by laboratories operated by States and units of local government. Among other things, funds may be used to eliminate a backlog in the analysis of forensic evidence and to train and employ forensic laboratory personnel, as needed, to eliminate such a backlog. The Coverdell Act requires that 15 percent of program funds be awarded competitively. These “competitive” funds may be awarded to SAAs or dispersed directly to units of local government based on the merits of the respective applications. This solicitation will fund competitive awards only.

Deadline: 
04/30/2018
Funding Source: 
National Institute of Justice
Eligible Grantees: 

Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
County governments
State governments
City or township governments

BJA FY 18 Innovations in Community-Based Crime Reduction Program

**BCJI funds place-based, community-oriented, and data-driven initiatives undertaken by cross-sector partners. Partnerships can include all relevant stakeholders: law enforcement and criminal justice (such as prosecutors, defense, pretrial, corrections and reentry agencies), education, housing, city attorneys, health and human services, community and faith-based nonprofits, local volunteers, residents, and businesses.**

BJA seeks applications for the Byrne Criminal Justice Innovation Program. This program furthers the Departments mission by leading efforts to enhance the capacity of local and tribal communities to effectively target and address significant and violent crime issues through collaborative cross-sector approaches that are linked with broader neighborhood development goals. Eligible applicants are limited to states, institutions of higher education (including tribal institutions of higher education), units of local government, nonprofit organizations (including tribal nonprofit organizations), and federally recognized Indian tribal governments (as determined by the Secretary of the Interior) as fiscal agent. The goal of BCJI is to reduce crime, increase trust, and improve community safety as part of a comprehensive strategy to advance neighborhood revitalization. Through a broad cross-sector partnership team, including neighborhood residents, BCJI grantees target neighborhoods with hot spots of violent and serious crime and employ data-driven, cross-sector strategies to accomplish this goal.

Deadline: 
04/29/2018
Funding Source: 
Bureau of Justice Assistance
Eligible Grantees: 

Private institutions of higher education
City or township governments
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
County governments
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)

NIJ FY18 Postconviction Testing of DNA Evidence

**This opportunity may be a good fit for a Public Defender program that is working to or interested in postconviction review and/or exoneration based on biological evidence. This may linked to work around conviction integrity and wrongful conviction.**

NIJ seeks proposals for funding to assist in defraying the costs associated with postconviction DNA testing in cases of violent felony offenses (as defined by State law) in which actual innocence might be demonstrated. Funds may be used to identify and review such postconviction cases and to locate and analyze associated biological evidence. This supports the DOJ mission to ensure fair and impartial administration of justice for all Americans. While successful exonerations to correct injustice are notable program outcomes, the careful review, consideration and closing of cases subjected to postconviction DNA testing that do not ultimately demonstrate innocence also work to advance the public's interest that justice has been fairly applied.

Deadline: 
04/26/2018
Funding Source: 
National Institute of Justice
Eligible Grantees: 

Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
City or township governments
State governments
County governments

NIJ Research and Evaluation on Drugs and Crime FY 2018

**This opportunity may be appropriate for Defender programs with existing relationships with Law Enforcement agencies.**

NIJ's drugs and crime portfolio supports research on law enforcement efforts to deter, investigate, prosecute, and address illegal drug trafficking, markets, and use. This FY2018 solicitation will seek investigator-initiated proposals to conduct applied research on evidence-based tools, protocols, and policies for State, local and tribal jurisdictions. The two drug priorities are: 1) opioid-related criminal investigation, prosecution, drug intelligence, and community surveillance; and 2) illegal marijuana markets and drug-related violent crime. Opioid research proposals should address narcotics law enforcement, forensic science, and/or medicolegal death investigations; and opioids include heroin, fentanyl, diverted pharmaceuticals, synthetic drugs, and analogues.

With this solicitation, NIJ seeks proposals for applied research that examines the feasibility, impact, and cost efficiency of evidence-based tools, protocols, and policies for State, tribal, and local law enforcement and other criminal justice agencies that address two drug priorities: (1) drug trafficking, markets, and use related to heroin and other opioids (including fentanyl, diverted pharmaceuticals, synthetic drugs, and analogues); and (2) illegal marijuana markets and drug-related violent crime. All proposed projects should examine novel approaches to common problems, demonstrate methods to generate actionable information, promote innovative partnerships between stakeholders, and add value to resources that can be sustained long-term and replicated by other jurisdictions for a national scale impact.

Deadline: 
04/25/2018
Funding Source: 
National Institute of Justice
Eligible Grantees: 

In general, NIJ is authorized to make grants to, or enter into contracts or cooperative agreements with, States (including territories), units of local government, federally recognized Indian tribal governments that perform law enforcement functions (as determined by the Secretary of the Interior), nonprofit and for-profit organizations (including tribal nonprofit and for-profit organizations), institutions of higher education (including tribal institutions of higher education), and certain qualified individuals. Foreign governments, foreign organizations, and foreign colleges and universities are not eligible to apply. All recipients and subrecipients (including any for-profit organization) must forgo any profit or management fee.

NIJ FY18 Research and Development in Forensic Science for Criminal Justice Purposes

**This opportunity may be a good fit for a Public Defender program that is working to or interested in increasing knowledge and building best practices in forensic sciences. This might also be linked to work around conviction integrity and wrongful conviction.**

With this solicitation, NIJ seeks proposals for basic or applied research and development projects. An NIJ forensic science research and development grant supports a discrete, specified, circumscribed project that will: (1) increase the body of knowledge to guide and inform forensic science policy and practice, or (2) lead to the production of useful material(s), device(s), system(s), or method(s) that have the potential for forensic application. The intent of this program is to direct the findings of basic scientific research; research and development in broader scientific fields applicable to forensic science; and ongoing forensic science research toward the development of highly-discriminating, accurate, reliable, cost-effective, and rapid methods for the identification, analysis, and interpretation of physical evidence for criminal justice purposes. Projects should address the challenges and needs of the forensic science community. The operational needs discussed at NIJ’s FY 2016 Forensic Science TWG meeting may be found on NIJ.gov. Additional research needs of the forensic science community can be found at the Organization of Scientific Area Committees website. While the goals and deliverables of proposed projects do not necessarily need to result in immediate solutions to the posted challenges or needs, they should speak to them and produce knowledge that adds to work towards eventual resolutions.

Deadline: 
04/23/2018
Funding Source: 
National Institute of Justice
Eligible Grantees: 

Individuals
City or township governments
Private institutions of higher education
State governments
For profit organizations other than small businesses
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
County governments
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Small businesses
Special district governments

TTA to Support the Protection of Constitutional Rights Under the Sixth Amendment

Strategic Planning, Evaluation Services and Systems Issues

BJA is offering Training and Technical Assistance in two ways through our 2017 National Initiatives Adjudications: TTA to support the Protection of Constitutional Rights Under the Sixth Amendment awards.

State and local governments and their agents may require a deeper or broader understanding as to the current state of their public defense systems, and the best ways to address any identified issues. BJA offers assistance in creating strategic, individualized TTA plans by conducting a thorough needs assessment and data diagnostic of each jurisdiction. This approach combines research and practice to improve planning, site coordination, and implementation across jurisdictions that are diverse in size, region, funding, defense delivery system, and data capacity. There will be on-site and remote technical assistance.

In addition, BJA will select one state to undergo a comprehensive evaluation against prevailing Sixth Amendment case law to identify and remedy systemic deficiencies.

Deadline: 
04/13/2018
Funding Source: 
Bureau of Justice Assistance
Eligible Grantees: 

See application form for additional information.

Advancing Cross-System Partnerships Leadership Lab

NACo invites counties to apply for the Advancing Cross-System Partnerships Leadership Lab (“Leadership Lab”) and develop a strategy for implementing policies and practices that will transform how county justice, health and human services systems use and maximize data to identify and evaluate how they collectively serve individuals. The goal of this cross-system collaboration is to improve the social, health and economic circumstances and outcomes of justice-involved populations.

For a 15-month period, beginning in June 2018, the Leadership Lab will bring up to four counties together to form a cohort that is focused on and committed to advancing the design and implementation of data- and outcome-centered processes that support system-wide decision making across justice, health and human services systems. Each county will form a multidisciplinary team to support its work to institutionalize data-driven policies and practices that cut across county systems and services.

Counties selected to participate in the Leadership Lab will be expected to demonstrate progress in making connections between their health, human services and justice systems and using and analyzing data to create and/or expand opportunities that improve the well-being, self-sufficiency, stability and health outcomes (e.g., educational attainment, housing, food security, workforce participation and income, treatment engagement, utilization of primary care and preventative care services, family reunification, etc.) for a subset of the justice-involved population by appropriately and effectively directing services and supports.

Deadline: 
04/13/2018
Funding Source: 
National Association of Counties
Eligible Grantees: 

Before applying, counties must form or have the strong foundation for a multidisciplinary team or working group.

The team must have one county commissioner/supervisor as well as a senior-level representative from each of the justice, health and human services systems. Teams should select up to four additional members from agencies or organizations needed to meet the expectations of the Leadership Lab, such as:

  • County jail
  • Community corrections
  • Pretrial services
  • Treatment provider
  • Case management provider
  • Homeless services
  • Food assistance
  • Public assistance
  • Child welfare
  • Family services
  • Workforce development
  • Education
  • Information technology
  • Veterans’ services
  • Community action agency

Each team member must commit to staying engaged and designating a representative if he/she is unable to participate in project activities. 

Communities Building Healthier Environments for a Stronger Nation Initiative (‘Communities Initiative’)

**This may be a great opportunity for an office that has an internal program or existing relationship with a mental health provider or organization**

The Communities Building Healthier Environments for a Stronger Nation Initiative (‘Communities Initiative’) intends to demonstrate the effectiveness of community-based networks in improving health outcomes among racial and ethnic minority and/or other disadvantaged populations. This program seeks to improve health outcomes through the establishment of integrated networks that collaboratively employ evidence-based disease management and preventive health activities; build the capacity of communities to address social determinants and barriers to healthcare access; and increase access to and utilization of preventive health care, medical treatment, and supportive services. The Communities Initiative specifically targets the unmet healthcare and supportive service needs of racial and ethnic minority populations at highest risk for poorer health outcomes. Health services provided under the Communities Initiative will not be denied to any person based on race, color, or national origin. Populations at highest risk include, but are not limited to, individuals who are newly diagnosed and lack a medical home; individuals who experience difficulty in adhering to a prescribed medical treatment plan; individuals with a chronic disease that is not well managed; and individuals that are unstably housed. Specific health areas to be addressed by the Communities Initiative include asthma, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis B or C, obesity/overweight, and mental disorders. Community health programs are required to address social determinants of health, and improve coordination of health, social, and supportive services to significantly improve health outcomes among minority and/or disadvantaged communities. Applicants must choose two but no more than three chronic conditions to be the focus of the proposed intervention, but should justify this choice based on the population targeted and the interrelation of the chronic conditions. Project plans relative to health areas must include screening and early detection; implementation of evidence-based prevention and intervention programs; chronic disease management; linkage to medical treatment and follow-up; and coordination of applicable health, social and support services. Project plans must also address social determinants relative to selected health areas that directly facilitate the onset or transmission of disease or impact adherence to prescribed medical treatment plans.

Grantor Contact Information: Robin Fuller Senior Grants Management Specialist, 240-453-8830

Deadline: 
04/02/2018
Funding Source: 
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health
Eligible Grantees: 

State Governments • County Governments • City or township governments • Special district governments • Independent school districts • Public and State controlled institutions of higher education • Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized) • Public Housing authorities/Indian housing authorities • Native American tribal organizations (other than federally recognized tribal governments) • Nonprofits having 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education • Nonprofits without 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education • Private institutions of higher education • For profit Organizations other than small business • Small Businesses

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